The mental anatomy of a grappler.

The beauty of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu- or indeed any of the grappling arts- is that there is no body type or kind of person that can’t learn to grapple. People with very body type, every personality, race, culture, religion or walk of life can learn to grapple.

If anyone can learn, why do so many quit? Today I want to explore the ‘mental anatomy’, if you will, of the lifelong grappler and what it takes to develop the mentality. Continue reading “The mental anatomy of a grappler.”

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Whatever you do, just don’t stop.

As a teacher, I’ve seen far too many young people learn how to quit before they learnt how to persist. As a training partner, I’ve seen talented people quit because accepting that they could possibly be bad at something was too much.

You never know how close you are to a break through. You never know how close or how far your next success is… the only thing that is certain is that quitting is not the solution.

Whatever you do, just don’t stop.

Thanks for reading.

Oss.

The days when you don’t feel like doing it are the most important.

“Damn, I’m so tired.” “I’m really not feeling it today.” “This just isn’t my day.” 

We’ve all heard statements like these before, and most likely thought or said them ourselves at some point. Everyone has those kind of days where nothing is going right, where we’re too stressed or drained to feel up to the challenge of training.

The days when you don’t feel like training are the most important days to train.  Continue reading “The days when you don’t feel like doing it are the most important.”

Focusing on the ‘Why’.

Why did you start training? Everyone has their reasons, but sometimes we forget. When we are conscious about the ‘why’, it is far easier for us to stay focused and motivated to reach that goal than if we lose track. I want to explore how refocusing yourself on the ‘why’ can re-inject motivation and direction into your training. Continue reading “Focusing on the ‘Why’.”

Trust the Process, Respect the Outcome

“Every time you make a payment, there’s a receipt.” That’s what I was told to conclude a conversation with a seasoned martial arts instructor. It started the development of an idea in my mind: If you trust in the process and are prepared to do what is required, you will reap a positive outcome. I want to elaborate on this concept in this post with close reference to Jiu-jitsu, promotions, competition and work ethic. Continue reading “Trust the Process, Respect the Outcome”

Asking for it versus Taking it: Thoughts on expectations and perceptions of “what you deserve”

We live in an age where social media and ultra fast digital communications have bred a culture of instant gratification, providing instant gratification and superficial satisfaction for those who seek it. Despite how “noble” we may think our disciplines or pursuits are, they are not immune to these pitfalls.

I want to take some time to hopefully make you reflect on what it is you want. What do you feel like you’re entitled to? Do you feel as if you deserve it? What do you ask for and what do you deserve?  Continue reading “Asking for it versus Taking it: Thoughts on expectations and perceptions of “what you deserve””

Stay Alive: Thoughts on dealing with depression.

I recently saw a piece of writing that said “Up to this point, you’ve survived 100% of the challenges you’ve faced in you life. You’re doing pretty well so far.” 

It’s true. The fact that you’re alive to read this, despite the problems you’re facing today, means that you’ve successfully survived everything life has  thrown at you as far.

Having dealt with many teens and students suffering from acute depression post the Christchurch Earthquake, I struggled at first to find ways to make students realize that they still had things to be grateful for. They couldn’t find the way to the light. Having battled throughout my life with depression too, it really upset me that I was not able to show these students a way to overcome it.

The answer was far simpler than I thought… If you’re alive, you’re already doing far better than you thought. None of the problems you’ve encountered so far have been big enough to kill you, which means that either you’re stronger than you think or that the gravity of your problems aren’t actually as heavy as you think. 

The big problem with depression is that it’s not rational. It lurks in the deep egresses of our subconscious and crawls forward like a fog without showing itself to the person suffering from it. To overcome it, we first have to identify it, then we can consciously counter it by dwelling on what we are grateful for and what we have achieved despite it.

So, dwell on what you’re grateful for. 

If you’re reading this, it means you’re alive, so there’s one thing you can be grateful for already. 

If you’re alive, you’ve survived all the adversity you’ve already faced in your life. 

If you’re alive, it means you can still overcome any adversity that you are still yet to face too.