Objectivity versus Relativity: An exploration of perspective and reflection

Two of the most important things I have learnt in the fields of education and Philosophy are Objectivity and Relativity.

Recently I’ve come to see just how broadly these two ways of thinking apply beyond just these two fields; particularly in my BJJ practice.

*For the sake of this exploration, I would like to work with the following definitions of Objectivity & Relativity.

1. Objectivity refers to concrete or set axioms (statements) of truth that do not shift regardless of which perspective they are examined from.

2. Relativity refers to statements which, depending on the perspective they are approached from, will have a subjective value; being either true or false depending on the conditions of the situation or person.

Let’s continue…

Continue reading “Objectivity versus Relativity: An exploration of perspective and reflection”

Be Original: Two ways originality can change your Jiu Jitsu.

If you have a look at the top level competitors and practitioners in any sport, you begin to notice that they have a style that is distinctly their own.

It is extremely uncommon for us to be able to draw analogies between the greats of any sporting field, especially martial arts. We see this distinctly within Brazilian Jiu Jitsu too; any of the highest level competitors are very distinct in their strategies, style and technique.

Originality (and your ability to be original) plays a major factor in your improvement. Here are two ways originality can impact on your Jiu Jitsu. Continue reading “Be Original: Two ways originality can change your Jiu Jitsu.”

Testing your ideas

Everything is just a theory until we put it into practice. 

I can hold beliefs and opinions about a great many things. However, those theories mean nothing if they are not confirmed by application. This is a crucial differentiation to make: It does not necessarily follow that something should be just because you believe it to be. You must test your beliefs and apply them to make sure that they are confirmed by reality. 

Just because someone holds the belief that they are the best, does not necessarily mean they are the best. They have to test this belief by weighing their skills against others. Their beliefs will only be confirmed if the results confirm them.

When someone dictates their opinions to others without having their opinions questioned or tested in an open exchange or dialogue, they are being irrational. Rationality is reality. If I roll up to training or my job believing that I am already the best, that I have nothing left to learn, I will be unable to improve. I would be holding an irrational belief about myself and my abilities that would only serve to hold me back; restricting my ability to grow as a professional, a martial artist or human being

We must learn to be willing to test all of our most precious ideas and beliefs. If you hold something to be too sacred to you- and it is irrational- you dig the grave for your own personal and intellectual growth.

So, before you hit someone with an “I think..” or a “You should…”, try asking “What do you think…” or “What should I…” I lose interest so rapidly in a one way conversation where I’m being told rather than being listened to. Most people are, even if they’re too polite to tell you.

Don’t punish people with irrational ideas, put your ego aside and try to engage people intellectually; you might even learn something.

Thanks for reading.

Oss.

 

The Orthodox & the Unorthodox: Thoughts on approaching unpredictable opponents.

In general terms, we can divide practitioners into two categories: Orthodox and Unorthodox. This is a categorization of types of Jiu jitsu practitioners and the way they express the art form.

Have you ever found yourself mid-contest with an opponent who, even though you know exactly what they’re going to do, still manages to finish you? What about the opponent that is about as predictable as a rabid vermin; throwing unpredictable techniques out at a rate that you are unable to contend with? This is a question of styles. Neither is wrong, but both present us with issues of predictability. 

Let’s explore this in more depth… Continue reading “The Orthodox & the Unorthodox: Thoughts on approaching unpredictable opponents.”

Whatever you do, just don’t stop.

As a teacher, I’ve seen far too many young people learn how to quit before they learnt how to persist. As a training partner, I’ve seen talented people quit because accepting that they could possibly be bad at something was too much.

You never know how close you are to a break through. You never know how close or how far your next success is… the only thing that is certain is that quitting is not the solution.

Whatever you do, just don’t stop.

Thanks for reading.

Oss.