Objectivity versus Relativity: An exploration of perspective and reflection

Two of the most important things I have learnt in the fields of education and Philosophy are Objectivity and Relativity.

Recently I’ve come to see just how broadly these two ways of thinking apply beyond just these two fields; particularly in my BJJ practice.

*For the sake of this exploration, I would like to work with the following definitions of Objectivity & Relativity.

1. Objectivity refers to concrete or set axioms (statements) of truth that do not shift regardless of which perspective they are examined from.

2. Relativity refers to statements which, depending on the perspective they are approached from, will have a subjective value; being either true or false depending on the conditions of the situation or person.

Let’s continue…

Continue reading “Objectivity versus Relativity: An exploration of perspective and reflection”

A car crash in Seoul

“Someone should do something about that.” 

Sometimes we have no choice but to be that someone.

I took a trip to South Korea in 2015, it was the first time I had ever traveled solo.

A significant event, a late night car crash on the streets of Seoul, made me choose between being an onlooker, saying “Someone should do something.” or being that someone.  Continue reading “A car crash in Seoul”

Innovation & Pushing your limits.

One of the best feelings in training must certainly be when that one challenging technique you’ve been trying to pull off finally works. For weeks or maybe even months you’ve been trying to put the pieces of a sequence together; finally the stars align and you pull it off, only for it to become a main stay in your arsenal of techniques.

Jiu-jitsu is an art of innovation. Testing new techniques out and adding them to your game is one of the most fun parts of the martial art. Jiu-jitsu teaches us to Innovate.

How do we innovate in our training? The answer is two fold and surprisingly simple: The Consistency and Rigor of our testing leads to innovation.

These are the 2 things you need to know to become a more innovative grappler… Continue reading “Innovation & Pushing your limits.”

Testing your ideas

Everything is just a theory until we put it into practice. 

I can hold beliefs and opinions about a great many things. However, those theories mean nothing if they are not confirmed by application. This is a crucial differentiation to make: It does not necessarily follow that something should be just because you believe it to be. You must test your beliefs and apply them to make sure that they are confirmed by reality. 

Just because someone holds the belief that they are the best, does not necessarily mean they are the best. They have to test this belief by weighing their skills against others. Their beliefs will only be confirmed if the results confirm them.

When someone dictates their opinions to others without having their opinions questioned or tested in an open exchange or dialogue, they are being irrational. Rationality is reality. If I roll up to training or my job believing that I am already the best, that I have nothing left to learn, I will be unable to improve. I would be holding an irrational belief about myself and my abilities that would only serve to hold me back; restricting my ability to grow as a professional, a martial artist or human being

We must learn to be willing to test all of our most precious ideas and beliefs. If you hold something to be too sacred to you- and it is irrational- you dig the grave for your own personal and intellectual growth.

So, before you hit someone with an “I think..” or a “You should…”, try asking “What do you think…” or “What should I…” I lose interest so rapidly in a one way conversation where I’m being told rather than being listened to. Most people are, even if they’re too polite to tell you.

Don’t punish people with irrational ideas, put your ego aside and try to engage people intellectually; you might even learn something.

Thanks for reading.

Oss.

 

Hitting the wall: Thoughts on plateaus & mental blocks in training.

Many a student has experienced the notorious “plateau” or felt the sensation that they, try as they might, are getting nowhere with their training. “Hitting the wall” is or experiencing a mental block is common in any area of learning, Martial Arts being no different.

I would like to share my thoughts on why I believe that the dreaded plateau does not exist. In my opinion, it is in fact a symptom of a far more important cause that needs to be treated in your practice.  Continue reading “Hitting the wall: Thoughts on plateaus & mental blocks in training.”

Experimentation: Trial and Error

A huge part of Brazilian Jiu-jitsu’s continuing success as a martial art is an emphasis on creativity and experimentation.

No two practitioners will express themselves in the same way: some will prefer certain techniques and movements over others and develop their own particular style through a process of discovery, experimentation & trial and error. I’d like to explore the importance of Experimentation in this post.

Hold on, ‘cos we’re about to get scientific.

Continue reading “Experimentation: Trial and Error”